Freedom in Christ

What does it mean to be free? Merriam-Webster defines “free” as having the legal and political rights of a citizen or not subject to the control or domination of another. Living in the United States of America is supposed to afford us all the opportunity to realize what it means to be free. Marines, Sailors, Soldiers, and Airmen have fought, bled, and died to secure and preserve the freedom which was intended to be enjoyed by all the citizens of this nation. We all should be thankful for the sacrifices of those who have gone before us and we should strive to make sure every citizen of this country has equal access to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

There is, however, a more precious freedom available to us through the gospel of Jesus Christ. God, the Creator and Sustainer of the universe, sent His one and only Son to the earth in order to fulfill completely and perfectly the righteous requirements of God’s law. Jesus, the perfect Son of God, then willingly and obediently laid down His life on the cross of Calvary, rising again victoriously on the third day. He did this in order to purchase redemption and eternal life for all who would trust in Him alone by grace through faith. This is the good news of the gospel according to Scripture. At this point, we should ask ourselves a few questions:  Are we sinners, totally lost and separated from God, and by nature deserving the full wrath of God? (See Ephesians 2:1-3) Are we unable to do anything at all to help ourselves, make ourselves better, or save ourselves from sin and death? (See Ephesians 2:8-9) Did Jesus Christ perfectly fulfill the righteous requirements of the law on our behalf by dying in our place for our sins on the cross? (See Romans 5:8, 6:23, & 8:1-4)

Now if you answered yes to all three of those questions (and I sincerely hope you did because they are all true), then there is only one appropriate response in light of these biblical truths. We should be humble and broken in the presence of Almighty God who has saved us from our sin by the shed blood of His perfect Son. There should be an overflow of gratitude and thanksgiving directed toward our loving Father who set us free when we were faced with eternal condemnation. This gratitude and thanksgiving should find expression in our actions as we strive to live in a manner “worthy of the calling [we] have received” (Ephesians 4:1). Our worship should overflow as well when we consider the beauty and the majesty of King Jesus. Ultimately, this should affect the way we treat others and the way we stand against injustice.

True freedom does not consist of doing whatever we want to do. True freedom is the ability to do what is right in the sight of God. “He has told you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” (Micah 6:8).

Mike. Out.

The Long-Suffering of God

The God of the Bible has may characteristics. Honestly, one could use a considerable amount of time simply listing the character traits of God, much less thoroughly defining each one. There is one quality, though, that has been on my heart and mind quite a bit lately. I suppose the reason I have been thinking about it so much is because of how often I need God to exercise this particular quality when dealing with me. I am speaking of the seldom used word, “long-suffering.”

I believe the word “long-suffering” was once used more frequently than it is in today’s culture. I find that I run across this word more often in reading than I do in conversations. Observation tells me that people may tend to use the word “patience” where previous generations may have said “long-suffering.” I believe, however, this word does a much better job of describing the character of God. I believe it reaches a depth not found in the word “patience.”

The definition of “patience,” according to Merriam-Webster, is “bearing pains or trials calmly or without complaint.” Now, that is all well and good, but it seems to me this definition would apply more readily to humans than it would the Sovereign God of the universe. Consider the definition of “long-suffering” from the same source. Long-suffering is defined as “patiently enduring lasting offense or hardship.” Now we are getting somewhere. You will notice the word “patient” is used in the meaning of “long-suffering” so there is certainly a connection between the two words. But I believe the distinction is found in the word “offense.”

The Apostle Paul, under the inspiration and direction of the Holy Spirit, reminds us “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God. They are justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus” (Romans 3:23-24, CSB). Knowing all have sinned is important, especially when considering the meaning of sin and how it alters one’s relationship with God. The Exegetical Dictionary of the New Testament defines sin [Greek = hamartia] as “primarily a failure to achieve a standard (whether culpable or unintentional) in the broadest sense, both as deed and as the nature of the deed.” The key word here is “standard” because…whose standard is it? It is the standard of Jesus Christ.

You see, this is why I am constantly (it seems) being reminded of the long-suffering of God. Every time I personally “fall short” and fail to meet God’s standard in Christ I go through this process of conviction, guilt, self-pity, confession, repentance, forgiveness, and gratitude. It truly is quite the vicious cycle. God is abundantly long-suffering toward His children despite the “lasting offense” they keep causing by sinning against an infinitely holy God. It is this realization to which I came this afternoon. I received a lesson from the Holy Spirit regarding prayer, trust, and faith. Unfortunately, this is not the first time I have been taught this lesson. You would think I would have learned it by now. Hence, my reflection on the long-suffering of God.

So the next time you fail God’s standard of His perfect Son, our Savior, Jesus Christ, I offer you this counsel: confess your sin, repent, seek forgiveness, and thank God for his abundant grace and mercy. I serve an awesome, long-suffering God and I am so thankful.

Mike. Out.

The Main Event

Church culture can be captivating. There are typically so many things happening that something is bound to get your attention. In fact, if you were to take a moment to consider the church you currently attend, you would most likely be able to pinpoint the particular thing that was most significant in leading you to unite with that spiritual family. Nevertheless, there is one task charged to every gospel-centered church that stands above the rest. “The fundamental reason your church exists is to make disciples of Jesus” (Geiger, et al., Transformational Discipleship, 10).

Two specific passages of Scripture come to mind on this subject: Matthew 28:18-20 and Colossians 1:25-29. The first passage is a pretty obvious choice if you have been exposed to spiritual things at all. “The Great Commission,” as it is often called, tells us very clearly we are to “make disciples of all nations.” The other passage, however, is a little less well-known in the discipleship conversation. We read some key words within the Colossians passage in verse 28. Paul writes, “We proclaim Him, admonishing every man and teaching every man with all wisdom, so that we may present every man complete in Christ.”

The word “complete” can be understood to mean “mature.” In other words, Paul’s purpose in teaching was to see every believer growing in Christ to the point that they were mature. Why is this important? I’m glad you asked. The necessity of making disciples at Berlin Baptist Church or any other church cannot be overstated. Eric Geiger and company explain, “For a church to be deficient in discipleship is to be deficient in its fundamental reason for existence. If any organization is careless in its core reason for existence, it doesn’t matter if the organization excels at other things” (Transformational Discipleship, 11).

So what’s the bottom line? Again, I’m glad you asked. Here it is: There are many things churches CAN do in ministry, but there are plain few things that churches MUST do in ministry. Making disciples is near the top of the list of things the church MUST do. Please let that sink in. If we do nothing else, we MUST preach the gospel and make disciples. Otherwise, we will fail to fulfill our reason for existence. How do we know if we are succeeding? We need only to look at ourselves and each other. “The end result of discipleship is not merely the knowledge of all Jesus commanded but the obedience to all Jesus commanded” (Transformational Discipleship, 18).

Are we growing in the grace and knowledge of Christ? Are there observable differences in our lives based upon our profession of faith? Are we influencing the culture for the glory of God? Let us pray together that the answers to these questions will all be yes in Jesus’ name.

Mike. Out.

The Deeper Life

One of the things that brings me the greatest joy is to see followers of Christ growing in their spiritual walk. I love when believers get closer and closer to Jesus. This includes me, too! It is always so exciting when the Lord draws me into His Word and teaches me something I haven’t noticed before. Times like these continue to build up my faith in Christ and encourage me in my walk with Him.

Reading the Bible is an indispensable ingredient when it comes to spiritual growth and walking with Jesus. In addition, it can prove helpful to read other books written by godly men and women who share your desire to go deeper in their relationship with Christ. This is one of the main reasons I frequently include excerpts from books in my newsletter articles. My goal is always to think critically about what I read and do my best to insure the information I pass on to others is both biblically faithful as well as practically encouraging. I hope to inspire others perhaps to want to read further in one of the books from which I quote.

A.W. Tozer is an author I enjoy reading very much. He was a powerful preacher from the 20th Century and his writing has had a definite impact on my spiritual life. In his book, The Radical Cross, Tozer writes about this “deeper life” and why believers should seek it. He explains, “The fact that so many professed Christians should be concerned with a ‘deeper life’ is tacit evidence that their spiritual experience has not been satisfactory. Many have looked themselves over and have turned away disappointed. When they talked to other professed Christians, they discovered that others were no better off than themselves” (15).

Have you ever been there? Have you ever done an assessment of your spiritual life and not been satisfied? If you have, then you are not alone. All believers will inevitably pass through times of self-conscious doubt. The important thing to remember is we do not need to stay in that place. Tozer gives us some direction on seeking a deeper relationship with Christ. He writes, “To enter upon such a life, seekers must be ready to accept without question the New Testament as the one final authority on spiritual matters. They must be willing to make Christ the one supreme Lord and ruler in their lives. They must surrender their whole being to the destructive power of the cross, to die not only to their sins but to their righteousness as well as to everything in which they formerly prided themselves” (16).

Folks, this is a tall order. It is incredibly challenging. All I can tell you is that it is totally worth it. To find grace and forgiveness from the One who shed His own blood for our sins, the Lord Jesus Christ has every right to require of us anything He chooses. He also has the abundant love and mercy to bless us with anything He chooses. Jesus has never failed to keep a promise. He promises eternal life to those who believe in Him. Trust Him. Follow Him. Seek the deeper life. You will be so glad you did.

Mike. Out.

The Joy of Christ(mas)

As many of you may know from experience, God’s Word is a splendid place to begin when searching for answers to the question, “What is God like?” We can observe much concerning His characteristics and attributes by simply looking around at the world He has created. Psalm 19:1 tells us “The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims His handiwork.” The glory of God is all around us. We see it in a beautiful sunrise. We see it in the vast array of stars in the sky on a clear night. We hear it in the crash of the waves on a peaceful, sandy beach. God is good and He is glorious.

It is at this time of year, however, that we are reminded much more of God’s grace, mercy, love, and forgiveness. We can see these things as we think about the incarnation of the Son of God. We remember these things as we ponder the biblical truth of Jesus Christ taking human form in order to live a sinless life and die a sinner’s death on our behalf. The story of Christmas is woven throughout the whole fabric of the Scriptures. The Psalmist writes, “If you, O Lord, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? But with you there is forgiveness, that you may be feared. I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in His Word I hope…O Israel, hope in the Lord! For with the Lord there is steadfast love, and with Him is plentiful redemption” (Psalm 130:3–5, 7).

As we approach this Christmas season, my prayer for myself and for each one of you is that we might spend more time pondering the goodness and the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ. I pray we will take time often to consider the true meaning of this wonderful celebration. I would encourage you to find a Bible-believing, Bible-teaching church in your area and attend their worship gatherings throughout this month of December so that you might take full advantage of every opportunity to draw closer to the Messiah. I would like to invite you personally to Berlin Baptist Church on December 22nd and December 29th at 11:00am and 6:00pm as we conclude our Advent series and look forward to God’s vision for His church during this next year and decade. You are always welcome at Berlin Baptist, but the important thing is for you to choose a biblical church and attend faithfully.

I pray you will be filled with great awe and wonder as you try “to comprehend with all the saints what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses all knowledge” (Eph 3:18–19). Having known the love of God, I pray we all will turn to Him both at Christmas and always. A.W. Tozer, in his book, “The Knowledge of the Holy,” concludes, “How completely satisfying to turn from our limitations to a God who has none.” This time of year is certainly as good a time as any to turn to experience salvation and forgiveness by surrendering your life to Jesus.

From my family to yours, we wish you a Christ-filled, merry Christmas and a glorious new year!

The Pride of Disagreement

God is gracious in his dealings with his people. He is good in all his ways and he gives good gifts to his children. Marriage is one of the greatest of these gifts. There are so many good things about Christian marriage. The peace and joy found in a biblical union is perhaps unparalleled. I could use this entire post to list positive characteristics of this kind of relationship, but I would rather begin with this premise in order to talk about an area of the marriage relationship that is far too often overlooked. I am referring to good communication, specifically in the context of disagreement.

Now I should mention how vitally important communication is in all areas of a relationship, but it can become painfully obvious very rapidly whenever there is disagreement. Emotions have begun to rise and sensitivity is at an all time high. The potential for misunderstanding increases and tone of voice becomes even more important. There are so many things that could go wrong at this point. In fact, at this point, it is likely many things have already gone wrong. So why do I even bring up all this stuff? Well, I’m glad you asked. Let me share a personal experience.

Recently my wife and I had a little disagreement. Now, we have been married for twenty-three years and we have three wonderful children, so this was not the first time, but it was the most recent time. We were looking at a particular situation from two different perspectives and we definitely did not see eye to eye. So how did we handle our little difference of opinion? Well, I would love to tell you we both maintained our composure and we treated each other with kindness as we sorted through the areas of disagreement. Unfortunately, this was not the case. Without going into too much detail, I will just say we had both placed a higher priority on defending our positions than we had on resolving the dispute in godly way.

I share this personal experience for a couple reasons. First, it would be beyond the realm of insanity to think a Pastor and his wife are somehow immune from arguments, much less struggling to resolve arguments in the proper way. Second, it is important to understand the root cause of failing to practice biblical conflict resolution. The root cause, of course, is sin, but specifically it is the sin of pride which is to blame. Pride causes a person to value their own opinion more than they value another human being. Pride causes a person to value winning an argument more than they value the gospel. I can tell you based on personal experience, but more importantly, based on the authority of God’s Word, it is ALWAYS sinful to behave in a prideful manner. Nothing good ever comes from a prideful attitude.

I offer one final thought to this brief monologue. Pride was in play when the enemy tempted Adam and Eve to disobey God in the Garden of Eden (Genesis 3:1-7). Pride was in play when the enemy tempted Jesus in the wilderness (Luke 4:1-13). Pride is in play when the enemy tempts you and me to act in a way contrary to that which brings glory and honor to the Savior King. Hear the words of the Apostle John, writing under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit: “Do not love the world or the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world–the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life–is not from the Father but is from the world. And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever” (1 John 2:15-17).

Pride is a dangerous thing and it always precedes a fall. Be on your guard.

Mike. Out.

Depart from me…I never knew you

I observe. I reflect. I analyze. I ponder. Typically, I am slow to conclude. In other words, I often see things and develop a particular opinion, but sometimes I hesitate to settle on a final conclusion due to the necessary implications of that conclusion. Perhaps I do not want to believe the inevitable. Perhaps the obvious truth causes me discomfort. I know what you may be thinking as you read: “What in the world are you talking about?” I’m glad you asked.

I have a growing concern as I observe the culture of Christianity around me. I once heard a statement attributed to Billy Graham saying he believed as many as fifty percent of the people attending local churches on a given Sunday were not truly followers of Christ. This is not to say they lacked the outward appearance of “good church folks,” but it speaks more to the idea that many people may be trusting in something or someone other than the finished work of Christ for their salvation. Now, they may never admit such a charge outright, but their behavior may paint just such a picture. This begs the question, “What does true biblical Christianity look like?”

Almost three years ago I was teaching through the book of Colossians for the student ministry of the church I served. One particular evening we were considering the first portion of chapter two in which we read the key verses of the letter. “For in him the whole fullness of deity dwells bodily, and you have been filled in him, who is the head of all rule and authority” (Col 2:9-10). Paul’s central theme here is the supremacy of Christ over all creation. It is this supremacy to which followers of Christ must appropriately respond. A truth central to Christianity surfaces in this passage: a Christian must BELIEVE Christ in order to FOLLOW Christ.

There is, in my opinion, an apparent disconnect between the way Scripture describes a true follower of Christ and the way the American church describes a true follower of Christ. In fact, there appears to be disagreement on what constitutes true biblical conversion. I believe there is no other logical explanation for the growing cultural perception of the church as both impotent and irrelevant. David Platt explains:

According to research (Barna Group, April 10, 2009), many “Christians” no longer believe that God is the supreme Creator and Ruler of the universe. Such “Christians” believe that everyone is god or that maybe god is simply the realization of one’s human potential. Over half of “Christians” don’t believe that the Holy Spirit or Satan is real, and tens of millions of them don’t believe that Jesus is the divine Son of God. Finally, almost half of “Christians” don’t believe the Bible is completely true.

I put Christians in quotation marks for what I hope by now is an obvious reason: such “Christians” are not Christians. It is impossible to follow Jesus yet disregard, discredit, and disbelieve his Word. Simply put, to follow Jesus is to believe Jesus (emphasis mine) (Platt, Follow Me, 77).

Jesus has never lied. His Word is always completely truthful. In addition, the Word of God is the standard by which all truth is judged. This is the critical point which I labored to drive home for those students that night. There is practical value for this truth as well. Friends, we are called to be true disciples of Jesus Christ. Therefore, we cannot afford to cling to any beliefs that are inconsistent with Scripture. It matters not whether we must struggle in order to process certain portions of biblical truth. It does, however, matter whether we are willing to submit to the complete Lordship of Jesus Christ.

This lesson is difficult. I am still in the process of learning this lesson myself, but it must be learned. If I am to claim the name of Christ, then I must submit to His Lordship in every area. This includes, not only my actions, but also my beliefs concerning salvation, justification, sanctification, discipleship and so on. I must always remember that in Christ “are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Col 2:3). I do not know better than Jesus, nor will I ever.

Mike. Out.

Whatever Happened to Holiness?

I have noticed lately that many churches and Christians seem to embrace a Christianity void of any genuine, transforming life change. I believe there are churches all over the state in which I live suffering from a lack of revival, a lack of evangelistic energy, and a lack of believers bothered by either one. People seem to be content to attend church services on Sunday morning, Sunday night, and possibly even Wednesday night. They are willing to serve on this committee or that ministry team. They even (grudgingly, it seems) put some money in the offering plate as it passes by. According to their own self-imposed standards, they are doing their part to sustain the kingdom work of God’s church. The problem is their lives seem to be no different from what they were before allegedly encountering the Creator of the universe.

What can be learned from people who will stand up and be counted when they are in the assembly of the righteous, but are content to fade into the crowd of carnality when going about their business in the community? I believe we can learn a great deal from this all too familiar phenomenon. The words of Christ are recorded in Matthew’s gospel account as He reminds us how to recognize false prophets. Jesus warns, “Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves. You will know them by their fruits. Grapes are not gathered from thorn bushes nor figs from thistles, are they? So every good tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot produce bad fruit, nor can a bad tree produce good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. So then, you will know them by their fruits” (Matt. 7:15-20, NASB). It seems logical that this litmus test could also be used for recognizing false Christians.

I am saddened that evidently many churches have decided to choose comfort over commitment, moderation over maturity, and satisfaction over surrender. Many seem to have traded in the concept of holiness for the much less controversial virtue of tolerance. I recall, however, English poet G.K. Chesterton once wrote, “Tolerance is the virtue of a man without conviction.” There is indeed a clear distinction between holiness and legalism. Legalism demands we become more like certain people. Holiness demands we become more like Jesus.

If the church is to return to a position of influence in the culture, then I believe we need men and women of God who are not afraid to plant their feet, square their shoulders, and declare, ‘Thus saith the Lord.’ I believe we need Pastors who will stand with boldness, taking up the mantle of the prophet of God, and call sin, sin, and righteousness, righteousness, leaving the consequences in the capable hands of Jesus.

A.W. Tozer, in his book We Travel an Appointed Way, writes, “It is time for Bible-believing Christians to begin to cultivate the sober graces and to live among men like sons of God and heirs of the ages. And this will take more than a bit of doing, for the whole world and a large part of the church is set to prevent it. But if God be for us, who can be against us?”

If God is for me, then who can be against me? That just may be all the motivation I need.

Mike. Out.

The Pitfalls of People Pleasing

I received an email with a brief devotional encouragement from Dr. Paul Tripp. This particular devotional made quite an impression on me and I suspect it may strike a chord with others as well. So rather than attempt to reinvent the wheel, I am sharing this wisdom with you just as it was shared with me. I pray you are blessed by it just as I was.

“I was a young pastor. I was doing everything I could to develop the teaching gift that God had given me. I knew my preaching wasn’t perfect, and I knew I needed to gain experience, but I wasn’t that bad of a preacher, right?”

“Wrong, at least for one. There was a critical man in our congregation who never seemed to be satisfied with my sermons, no matter how I approached them. One evening he came up to me and said, ‘Paul, your preaching is killing us.’ What a way to start a conversation!”

“It got worse. He handed me a set of tapes and said, ‘I suggest listening to these. Just mimic the preacher on the tapes and that will be better than what we’ve been getting.’ I was crushed. I thought my ministry was over.”

“In the weeks that followed, my preaching got worse. I was fearful and nervous. I stumbled over my words and had little confidence in my content. I would look out on the congregation, and this man was the only one my eyes could see. It seemed impossible for me to ignore his disapproving reactions and avoid his critical gaze.”

“What had happened to me? I didn’t realize it at the time, but I had fallen into the snare of pleasing people. The Bible also refers to this as the fear of man. Proverbs 29:25 says, “‘The fear of man lays a snare, but whoever trusts in the Lord is safe.’”

“It was clear – I had become trapped by my fear of this one man’s opinion. Finally, the oldest lady in our church had had enough. She came up to me after a sermon and said, ‘Paul, I’m convinced someone has gotten to you, and you’re preaching to please that person and not the Lord.’”

“Then she said, ‘Tomorrow, get up, forget that person, and study God’s Word. Preach what God has given you with confidence and joy or we’re all in trouble.’ And with that, she turned and walked out of the church.”

“I was so thankful for her honesty, and obviously am still thankful to this day. Why? Because this little old lady revealed something significant about my heart: under pressure of criticism, I fell into the snare of pleasing people instead of trusting in the Lord.”

“What about you? When you’re mistreated by another person, do you get angry and try to prove them wrong? Do you get intimidated and blindly follow their orders? Do you get wounded and attempt to avoid all future encounters with them?”

“There’s only one place where your heart can be healed, satisfied, and protected. It won’t be healed by exacting vengeance. It won’t be satisfied in human approval. It won’t be protected by hiding.”

“No, your heart will only be healed, satisfied, and protected when you trust in the Lord and follow his Word.”

“God bless,

Paul Tripp”

I could not have said it any better myself.

Mike.  Out.

God of This City

About twelve years ago Chris Tomlin recorded a song entitled, “God of This City.” The song has a very simple but profound message. The lyrics describe the God of the Bible as One who is incomparable and One who has a missionary heart. I remember exactly where I was when I first heard this song. The year was 2011. I was a passenger in a van riding through the Andes mountains of Peru. It was evening. Three Christian brothers (one who had traveled with me from the U.S., one driver, and one translator) accompanied me. We were moving from one village to another where we would meet with a new believer in order to begin a discipleship process.

As we carefully traversed the mountain road, the driver of the van was playing music from his phone through the sound system in the van. It was dark. The road was treacherous. I was in completely unfamiliar territory. Then it happened. This song began to play. I heard these words for the first time:

You’re the God of this city, You’re the King of these people,

You’re the Lord of this nation, You are

You’re the light in this darkness, You’re the hope to the hopeless

You’re the peace to the restless, You are

There is no one like our God, There is no one like our God

Greater things have yet to come and greater things are still to be done in this city

Greater things have yet to come and greater things are still to be done in this city

Needless to say, given my situation and surroundings at that moment, the words of this song made a tremendous impact on me. I began to weep. I was overcome with the truth of who God is and the reality of the darkness in the world. I was also reminded of the fact that, regardless of what I may see with my physical eyes, God had bigger plans for the people of these villages, these cities. He is God. He is King. He is Lord. God is who He is regardless and irrespective of whether or not we choose to acknowledge Him as such.

Fast forward five years. It was late in the evening on Friday, September 30, 2016. I was sitting in a hotel room in Raleigh, North Carolina. I was attending a conference about biblical discipleship sponsored by 9Marks and SEBTS (Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary). I had bumped into a good friend earlier that day who was also attending the conference. He serves a church in Roanoke, Virginia. He loves the Lord, he loves the Gospel, and he loves the people in the community he serves. You may be wondering why I am telling you about my friend. I’m glad you asked.

One striking similarity ties these two stories together. Every time this brother of mine posts something on social media regarding his ministry in the city of Roanoke, he types this statement at the end: “Roanoke belongs to Jesus.” Again, what a simple but profound statement. I took the opportunity that afternoon to tell my brother what an impact his statement has made in my life and ministry. What I neglected to tell him was how his statement had taken me back to the mountains of Peru. It had also given me great encouragement for ministry in general. It still does today.

Here is what I know. It matters not the geographical location where you serve. It matters not the particular people group you serve. What matters primarily is the God you serve. When you understand it is the Creator of the universe, the God of the Bible, whom you serve, things change. When you understand the Gospel of Jesus Christ, things change. When you understand the mission of God, things change.

Wherever God sends you to proclaim His gospel message, take heart and remember this:

Your city belongs to Jesus.

Mike. Out.